Liss Junior School


Name Liss Junior School
Website http://www.lissfederation.hants.sch.uk/
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
Address Hillbrow Road, Liss, GU33 7LQ
Phone Number 01730892292
Type Primary
Age Range 7-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 221 (54.3% boys 45.7% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 20.8
Local Authority Hampshire
Percentage Free School Meals 12.7%
Percentage English is Not First Language 5.4%
Persistent Absence 5.2%
Pupils with SEN Support 10.0%%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Inspection

Information about this school

The school is an average-sized primary school with two classes in each year group. In September 2018 it federated with Liss Infant School under one governing body. The federated schools are led by an executive headteacher, who was formerly the headteacher at Liss Junior School.

Since the last inspection there have been a number of staff changes, creating some turbulence for the school. The school has a resource base, which provides 12 places for pupils who have moderate learning difficulties. The school has a much higher proportion of pupils who have an education, health and care plan than is typical in most primary schools.

The percentage of pupils who are eligible for SEN support overall is less than in other schools nationally. The proportion of pupils who speak English as an additional language or who are from minority ethnic backgrounds is much lower than that found nationally. The percentage of disadvantaged pupils is below the national average.

The school provides a breakfast club that is run by the governing body.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school Since the previous inspection the headteacher has successfully driven improvements to raise standards of achievement. She has relentlessly improved teaching and learning.

Parents appreciate the many improvements that leaders have implemented. Pupils say that they spend more time learning than they used to do, and they are positive about this change. Governors know the school well and make regular checks to ensure that the school continues to move in the right direction.

They share the headteacher’s determination that in time, the very recent federation of the infant and junior schools will secure the highest possible standards. Teachers’ strong subject knowledge means that lessons help pupils to develop their skills and knowledge. Pupils’ good progress is particularly noticeable in mathematics, where outcomes were previously weaker.

Throughout the school there are high expectations for all pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities. They work hard, are well supported and are rightly proud of their efforts. The school has an effective resource provision for pupils who have education, health and care plans.

Lessons are carefully planned to meet individual needs. Differences in the achievement of disadvantaged pupils are narrowing as a result of leaders’ focused efforts. Current disadvantaged pupils achieve as successfully as other pupils with the same starting points.

Pupils are rarely absent from school. They behave well and show respect for others. They enjoy playing together in the school’s well-resourced outside spaces.

Pupils say that they feel safe in school at all times. They have supportive relationships with teachers and trust them to sort out any concerns they raise. The curriculum makes increasing demands of pupils.

The wider curriculum subjects engage pupils well. However, learning is not as well planned or led as it is in English and mathematics. Consequently, pupils’ progress and work in other subjects are not as strong.

Senior leaders have not had enough time for all of their recent improvement strategies to be fully effective. Consequently, some variability remains in teaching. Teachers do not consistently use their assessments to match learning activities to meet the needs of pupils who fall behind, particularly in writing.