Booker Avenue Junior School


Name Booker Avenue Junior School
Website http://www.booker-junior.com
Inspections
Ofsted Inspections
Address Booker Avenue, Liverpool, L18 9SB
Phone Number 01517242941
Type Primary
Age Range 7-11
Religious Character Does Not Apply
Gender Mixed
Number of Pupils 362 (50.6% boys 49.4% girls)
Number of Pupils per Teacher 24.3
Local Authority Liverpool
Percentage Free School Meals 8.8%
Percentage English is Not First Language 12.7%
Persistent Absence 3.9%
Pupils with SEN Support 13.5%%
Catchment Area Indicator Available Yes
Last Distance Offered Available No
Highlights from Latest Inspection

Information about this school

The school does not meet requirements on the publication of information about the content of the modern foreign language curriculum followed in each academic year on its website. The school is larger than the average-sized primary school.

Most pupils are of White British heritage. The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic groups and who speak English as an additional language is just above average. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is below average.

The proportion of pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is below average. The proportion of pupils with a statement of special educational needs or an education, health and care plan is below average. The school meets the government’s current floor standards, which are the minimum expectations for pupils’ attainment and/or progress by the end of Year 6 in reading, writing and mathematics.

The current headteacher took up his appointment in September 2014. Since the school’s last inspection, the school has established a nurture provision for up to 10 pupils who have social, emotional and educational needs (the Haven). Each morning, pupils are taught English and mathematics in this provision.

They rejoin their year group classes in the afternoons.

Summary of key findings for parents and pupils

This is a good school From their starting points, pupils make good progress in reading, writing and mathematics. By the end of Year 6, standards in these subjects, and in science, are at least in line with pupils of this age nationally.

In other subjects, the school has limited information about pupils’ progress. This is because assessments are at an early stage of development. Pupils benefit from a broad and interesting curriculum that extends beyond the school day.

They talk enthusiastically about their learning in many subjects. Across the school, teaching is typically good. At times, teachers do not adapt work well enough to pupils’ needs.

Support staff make a useful contribution, but are not always used to best effect. Pupils have good attitudes to learning. They work hard in lessons and behave well.

The vast majority attend school regularly. Some potentially vulnerable pupils have low attendance. Improvements are evident, but attendance for some of this group is still not high enough.

The school provides very good support for pupils who have social and emotional needs. Most parents value the school’s work. The headteacher leads the school well.

He has accurately identified the school’s strengths and the most important areas for improvement. Since the headteacher’s appointment, the impact of other senior leaders has improved. This has strengthened the school’s capacity for further improvement.

Subject leaders are enthusiastic and committed. However, they do not have a sufficiently comprehensive overview of teaching and learning in their subjects. Provision for pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities is good.

However, more information is needed to measure how well small-group teaching is helping pupils to catch up. Disadvantaged pupils and those who have SEN and/or disabilities make good progress. However, more precise information is needed.

Pupils are very well prepared for life in modern Britain. They respect people’s differences and have a very good understanding of equality. There are good strategies to keep pupils safe.

Pupils are confident that adults will listen to their concerns and act upon them. Governors provide good challenge and support for leaders. They manage finances well.